Tag Archives: branding

My Entrepreneurial Journey: My Startup’s Brand

When starting out a new company, it’s important that you establish the purpose of the business in the customer’s mind.  Surely the purpose is to make money and no one will argue with that.  But what does your customer think?  Do they understand what your business is trying to do for them?  Not only does your brand tell your customer what you do, it also helps communicate direction and focus for your efforts.

When I began creating my business plan for the company, I added a section for the brand.  This section wasn’t heavily detailed but it was critical for providing some initial direction and focus.  It begins with a simple identification of what we are trying to do.  When it comes to companies, here are a few reasons they exist:

  1. A better way to do it.  We know people (and companies) are creatures of habit.  Once a process is put in place, it stays that way until it fails.  This leaves opportunity to create something better, especially as technology is developed.  Most often, a better way usually reduces operating costs or provides some other unique benefits to the company.

My potential customers:  There is a process in place for the service I provide.  My customers either don’t do it or do it poorly.  My service will replace the customer’s need to use their inefficient process with additional benefits that reduce cost.

  1. Something completely novel. In this case, a company provides a product or service that didn’t exist.

My potential customers: Since a process already exists, I’m not really creating something new to the market but I am creating a new solution for the customer that has financial benefits.

  1. A solution to a problem. Your business should always be solving a problem or filling a need.

My potential customers:  They don’t know they have a problem, which could be challenging for me.  I’ll need to educate them first and then sell them on the benefits of the service.  This will need a strategy all by itself.

While there are other business purposes, these three represent the majority of my purpose.  Some companies will use “transparency” as a purpose.  However, I consider that to just be a part of business.  I know there are proprietary things in the business but the way I conduct my business should be very clear.

With my purpose identified, I can use this information to identify my target customer.  I know they may or may not already do the service I’m offering.  I also know, through research, that they are not very good at it.  I have also found that many of these customers have financial problems, which makes the benefits of my service all the more desirable.  The key factors that define my customer:

  • Do perform the service I offer but aren’t doing it efficiently
  • Do not perform the services I offer
  • May be unaware of the problem
  • May have financial issues
  • May desire to create change in their current processes

Now that I have some idea of my customer, I can begin a little research by contacting potential customers by asking probing questions that can clarify my above assumptions.  After gathering a little information, I can prepare marketing information that speaks directly to this customer.

While this isn’t a complete development of a brand, it does provide considerable direction for me while defining the purpose of my company to the customer.

Disclaimer:  These posts are general ramblings from me concerning my own startup experience.

ASK DR BUSINESS – How do I brand myself as an entrepreneur?

In this week’s post, we ask Dr Business about branding ourselves as an entrepreneur.

Question:  How do I brand myself as an entrepreneur?

Dr. Business says:

“The most successful entrepreneurs brands are a reflection of themselves e.g. Steve Jobs was Apple, and Apple was Jobs. Likewise, Ralph Lauren is Polo and Polo is Ralph Lauren, and Bezos is Amazon, etc., etc. Typically, entrepreneurs create a solution for a problem that they have themselves and pursue the commercialization of their solution with a passion that is a reflection of themselves. So, in essence they are the embodiment of the brand that they create.

If we take Jobs as the classic example of an entrepreneur that actually branded himself as an entrepreneur, he did that by coming up with one wonderful solution after another to problems that consumers did not realize they had until he delighted them with one neat new electronic i device before the last one was fully adopted. In so doing he embodied the epitome of cool creations. Others, like Bezos and Lauren continue to introduce new ways to delight consumers. I would say that the closer you can come to emulating these entrepreneurs and others the more obvious it becomes as to how necessary it is. 

The bad news is that you can’t copy these great brands easily. You can, however, execute the basic strategy. You must focus on doing things better or, better yet, uniquely. Demonstrate a passion for the details of your business more than your competitors do. Develop innovative ways to communicate and connect with your customers. Circle back and improve the things that can get better, and replace the things that can’t with something else. Then repeat this over and over. “

If you have a specific startup issue, share your problem with us and we’ll have Dr. Business assess it.   Send us your challenges at info@blitzteamconsulting.com